Lifestyle

Lobster fishing in Sweden

Nowadays, it seems a growing number of people are taking the time to learn to do things the traditional way. It may take a little longer but the reward can be well worth the wait. It was in this frame of mind that we set out to sea to try out a spot of traditional lobster fishing, and discover if there really is pleasure to be found in patience.

 

The call of the waves

If you’re in the mood for lobster, you can always visit your local supermarket or order one in a restaurant. But to set sail and suddenly find yourself wrestling with waves and peering in anticipation into lobster pots is a different experience altogether.
 

Evert’s Boathouse has occupied the same spot for 150 years. The wind whips the waves causing them to crash and roll. It’s almost as if the waves are beckoning us to come and join them. Fisherman Lars Karlsson is unconcerned by the crashing waves and the seas mighty swell as he makes his way out past barren granite cliffs, leaving land and the boathouse far behind him. Lars got his first boat when he was only seven years old, so he’s used to the conditions by now.

“To live here and be able to cast off whenever is a luxury. It doesn’t matter if the wind is howling and the rain is lashing down.”

Lars Karlsson, owner, Evert’s Boathouse

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Luxury in nature

“You must have respect for the sea and be aware of the dangers,” begins Lars who, along with his brother Per, runs Evert’s Boathouse. “As you get further away from land it may look calm and clear, but that can change very quickly. As lobsters get older they like to settle at the bottom of the sea and hide in rocky caves and crevices. This can make for some very dangerous fishing.”
 

“To actually live amongst these surroundings. To have access to the sea and be able to simply cast off whenever the mood takes you is my idea of luxury. To me, it makes no difference if the wind is howling or the rain is lashing down. Also, at the boathouse, I get the chance to meet and talk to people from all over the world. People who are interested in tradition and craftsmanship and doing things the old fashioned way.
 

I love when people want to come along and share the experience. This respect for the traditions of the past makes me very happy,” says Lars.