City Safety

Detection of obstacles with City Safety

Updated 1/14/2020

The obstructions that City Safety can detect are vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians.

Vehicles

City Safety™ detects most vehicles that are either stationary or moving in the same direction as the driver’s vehicle, as well as vehicles described in the "City Safety in cross traffic" section.

In order that City Safety™ shall be able to detect a vehicle in the dark, the vehicle's front and rear lights must be working and clearly illuminated.

Cyclists

Optimal examples of what City Safety  interprets as a cyclist — with clear body outline and bicycle outline.

Optimal examples of what City Safety interprets as a cyclist — with clear body outline and bicycle outline.

Optimal performance requires that the system function that detects a cyclist must receive the clearest possible information about the body and bicycle outline, requiring the ability to identify the bicycle, head, arms, shoulders, legs, upper and lower body plus a normal human pattern of movement.

If large parts of the cyclist's body or bicycle are not visible to the function's camera then the system cannot detect a cyclist.

For the function to be able to detect a cyclist, he/she must be an adult and riding a bicycle designed for adults.

Warning

City Safety is an aid.

The function cannot detect:

  • all cyclists in all situations and does not see partially obscured cyclists, for example.
  • cyclists wearing clothing that obscures the body outline.
  • bicycles loaded with large objects.

The driver is always responsible that the vehicle is driven properly and with a safety distance adapted to the speed.

Pedestrians

Optimal examples of what the system regards as pedestrians with clear body outlines.

Optimal examples of what the system regards as pedestrians with clear body outlines.

For optimal performance, the system function that detects pedestrians must receive the clearest possible information about the body outline, requiring the ability to identify the head, arms, shoulders, legs, upper and lower body plus a normal human pattern of movement.

In order that it shall be possible to detect a pedestrian there must be a contrast with the background and this will be affected by such things as clothes, the background and the weather. With poor contrast the pedestrian may either be detected late or not at all, which may mean that warnings and braking are late or omitted.

City Safety can detect pedestrians even in the dark by means of the car's headlights.

Warning

City Safety is an aid and cannot detect all pedestrians in all situations and, for example, cannot see:

  • partially obscured pedestrians, people in clothing that hides their body contour or pedestrians shorter than 80 cm.
  • pedestrians if the background contrast of the pedestrians is poor - warning and brake interventions may then be late or not occur at all.
  • pedestrians who are carrying larger objects.

The driver is always responsible that the vehicle is driven properly and with a safety distance adapted to the speed.


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