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£199 a month on Personal Contract Hire

The V90 T4 Momentum Auto

The Volvo V90 T4 Momentum  Automatic at £199 a month on Personal Contract Hire with Volvo Car Financial Services.

Monthly rental £199
Initial rental £3,500
21 month contract
8,000 miles per annum
Excess mileage charges apply.

* Important information: Ocean Automotive (Swedish) Ltd is acting as introducer. Contract hire provided by Santander Consumer (UK) PLC trading as Volvo Car Financial Services, RH1 1SR. 18’s & over, subject to status. Guarantee/Indemnity may be required. You will not own the vehicle and it must be returned in good condition to avoid further charges. Subject to availability for vehicles registered by 01/04/2019 to 30/06/2019. Not available with other promotions. Excess mileage will be charged at 7.56p per mile for the first 5,000 excess miles. After 5,000 excess miles, excess mileage will be charged at 10.08p per mile.

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Volvo Cars takes major step towards its electrified future

Range of new hybrid powertrains

Volvo Cars has taken a significant step towards its electrification goals with the release of upgraded and newly developed electrified powertrain options, to be made available across its entire model range in the future.

The company has upgraded its existing Twin Engine plug-in hybrid powertrain, while at the same time confirming that plug-in options will now be available on every model it produces.

Volvo Cars will introduce a range of mild hybrids in the coming months, starting with diesel and petrol versions on the XC90 and XC60 SUV models.

These mild hybrids for the first time offer customers Volvo’s advanced kinetic energy-recovery braking system, which is coupled with its existing internal combustion engines to create a new integrated electrified powertrain, under its new ‘B’ badge.  

This new powertrain, electrified via brake-by-wire energy recovery, offers drivers up to 15 per cent fuel savings and emission reductions in real-world driving.

The new brake-by-wire system interacts with the energy-recovery system and reduces fuel consumption and emissions by recovering kinetic energy under braking.

In line with its strategy and supported by extremely strong demand, Volvo Cars has upgraded its production capacity so that up to 25 per cent of total production can be Twin Engine plug-in hybrid cars. In addition, it expects its new ‘B’-badged powertrains to gradually become the new standard, moving it closer to its goal that by the middle of the next decade all of its cars will be electrified.

There will be new and upgraded powertrains introduced on Volvo’s larger Scalable Product Architecture (SPA)-based cars.

The upgraded T8 Twin Engine plug-in hybrid features a new battery and brake-by-wire advanced battery charging. The range of the T8 powertrain has increased by around 15 per cent, and this powertrain is available on all 90 and 60 series cars.

The XC90 will be available with a B5-badged mild-hybrid petrol or diesel variant, as well as a B6-badged petrol mild hybrid.

On the XC60, customers will be able to choose between a B5 mild-hybrid petrol or diesel variant, a B4 diesel mild hybrid as well as a B6 petrol mild hybrid. The B5 petrol will be available with front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive.

The company’s smaller Compact Modular Architecture-based XC40 SUV will also receive a new electrified option, in the form of a T5 Twin Engine petrol plug-in hybrid. A second, T4 Twin Engine, plug-in hybrid option will follow later.

 

Volvo Cars to impose 180kph (112mph) speed limit on all cars to highlight dangers of speeding

Volvo Cars, as a worldwide leader in safety, is sending a strong signal about the dangers of speeding and will limit the top speed on all its cars to 180kph (112mph) from 2020.

The company’s Vision 2020, which aims for no one to be killed or seriously injured in a new Volvo by 2020, is one of the most ambitious safety visions in the automotive industry. But realising that technology alone will not get it all the way to zero, Volvo Cars is now broadening its scope to include a focus on driver behaviour.

Research by Volvo Cars has identified three remaining concerns for safety that constitute so-called ‘gaps’ in its ambition to completely end serious injuries and fatalities in its cars, with speeding a very prominent one.

“Volvo is a leader in safety: we always have been and we always will be,” said Håkan Samuelsson, President and Chief Executive of Volvo Cars. “Because of our research, we know where the problem areas are when it comes to ending serious injuries and fatalities in our cars. And while a speed limitation is not a cure-all, it’s worth doing if we can even save one life.”

Apart from limiting top speeds, the company is also investigating how a combination of smart speed control and geofencing technology could automatically limit speeds around schools and hospitals in future.

“We want to start a conversation about whether car makers have the right or maybe even an obligation to install technology in cars that changes their driver’s behaviour, to tackle things such as speeding, intoxication or distraction,” said Mr Samuelsson. “We don’t have a firm answer to this question, but believe we should take leadership in the discussion and be a pioneer.”

The problem with speeding is that above certain speeds, in-car safety technology and smart infrastructure design are no longer enough to avoid severe injuries and fatalities in the event of an accident. That is why speed limits are in place in most western countries, yet speeding remains ubiquitous and one of the most common reasons for fatalities in traffic.

Millions of people still get speeding tickets every year, and traffic accident data from the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration shows that 25 per cent of all traffic fatalities in the US in 2017 were caused by speeding.

People simply do not recognise the danger involved in speed, says Jan Ivarsson, one of Volvo Cars’ leading safety experts.

“As humans, we all understand the dangers with snakes, spiders and heights. With speeds, not so much,” said Mr Ivarsson. “People often drive too fast in a given traffic situation and have poor speed adaption in relation to that traffic situation and their own capabilities as a driver. We need to support better behaviour and help people realise and understand that speeding is dangerous.”

Beyond speeding, two other problem areas constitute ‘gaps toward zero’. As obvious a problem as speeding (and as difficult to end) is intoxication. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is illegal in large parts of the world, yet it remains a prime reason for injuries and fatalities on today’s roads.

The other area is distraction. Drivers distracted by their mobile phones or otherwise not fully engaged in driving are another major cause of traffic fatalities. In many ways, they are equally as dangerous as drunk drivers.

Volvo Cars will present ideas to tackle the problem areas of intoxication and distraction at a special safety event in Gothenburg, Sweden, on 20 March.